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How to Optimize Non-Coding Time

Conference
People & Culture

Github Copilot and tools that help us code better are cool. But I’m lucky if I spend 90 minutes a day writing code. We really need to optimize the hours we spend reviewing code, updating tickets and tracing where our code is deployed. Learn how I save an hour a day streamlining non-coding tasks.


This talk is unique because 99% of developer productivity tools and hacks are about coding faster, better, smarter. And yet the vast majority of our time is spent doing all of this other stuff. After I started focusing on optimizing the 10 hours I spend every day on non-coding tasks, I found I my productivity went up and my frustration at annoying stuff went way down.


I cover how to save time by reducing cognitive load and by cutting menial, non-coding tasks that we have to perform 10-50 times every day. For example:



Bug or hotfix comes through and you want to start working on it right away so you create a branch and start fixing. What you don’t do is create a Jira ticket but then later your boss/PM/CSM yells at your due to lack of visibility. I share how I automated ticket creation in Slack by correlating Github to Jira.


You have 20 minutes until your next meeting and you open a pull request and start a review. But you get pulled away half way through and when you come back the next day you forgot everything and have to start over. Huge waste of time. I share an ML job I wrote that tells me how long the review will take so I can pick PRs that fit the amount of time I have.



Scheduled on Thursday from 10:45 to 11:25 (Europe/Bucharest) in Track 3

Git
Culture
Developer Productivity

Yishai Beeri

LinearB

Yishai Beeri likes to solve problems, and that's why he was so fascinated with programming when first encountered Logo back in the 80s, where the possibilities seemed endless.


He has made it a focus of his career to solve complex programming problems, both as a consultant and entrepreneur. In 2014 he joined the CTO office of a fast-moving cloud security startup, which later was acquired by a networking giant. At this startup he also met Ori Keren and Dan Lines, now co-founders of LinearB. He joined them shortly after the company was established, in order to get back to what he loves most about engineering, solving big challenges, and this time he is focusing on the world of dev team metrics and software delivery management.